May 032019
 

29th: 1 Tree Sparrow behind Treshnish Old Schoolhouse. It was calling so perhaps there was another bird present. I think it was calling in our garden but I was busy photographing insects so I missed it. Tree Sparrow was until very recently, considerer a rarity in Argyll, now it is considered scarce.

3 Greylag families with 14 chicks in lower Ensay meadow near Ensay Burn mouth, Grey Wagtail family at Ensay Burn mouth.
Robin at waterfall hunting the insects.

At least 1 Red Wasp worker at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse



1 blood bee and furrow bees at Treshnish wood waterfall and a mining bee at cliffs south of Ensay Burn mouth.
1 new sawfly near waterfall but photograph came out terrible,


1 poss robberfly near waterfall

1 probable Slender-footed Robberfly Leptarthrus brevirostris south of Ensay Burn mouth

Bracken Chafer Phyllopertha horticola Treshnish wood waterfall

Aporophyla species larva, probably Northern Deep-brown Dart at Treshnish wood waterfall

1 poss Pyrausta purpuralis Treshnish wood waterfall

1 prob Pyrausta cingulata cliffs south of Ensay Burn mouth

1 prob Monopis weaverella south of Ensay Burn mouth

1 Platycheirus rosarum Ensay Burn cattlegrid

1 probable Chrysotoxum arcuatum south of Ensay Burn mouth.

1 click beetle poss Dalopius marginatus, near waterfall


1 Sexton beetle poss Nicrophorus vespilloidese Treshnish wood waterfall and Dor beetle in Ensay Burn cattlegrid.

Hawthorn Treshnish wood waterfall. I hadn’t realised there was so much in Treshnish wood. It is an incredible source of early food for insects.

Guelder-rose south of Ensay Burn mouth

1 new Broad-leaved Helleborine near waterfall (grazed).

Narrow-leaved Helleborine with developing ovaries below concrete ramp on Treshnish wood farm road.

28th: 2 large dragonflies which at this time of year were most probably Golden-ringed Dragonfly in front of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

Re-found the bee I thought was probably Red-backed Mining Bee female in front of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse and there was at least 1 male in the same spot which was presumably the same species These are all of the female. But now I think they are Wilke’s Mining Bee. I was reading the book wrong. The wider gap in the abdomen bands points to Red-backed but these have quite a narrow gap.






The bands on the abdomen are important for identification


I went to try and get better shots of the Wall Mason Bee but I couldn’t find it, perhaps it was too late in the day. I did find a blood bee, the small metallic furrow bee and a ruby-tailed wasp. I also found a very interesting wasp exploring the lichen on the bark of a Rowan tree but when I got back I found the mode of my macro camera had got moved onto the wrong setting! The Canon 7D mkII has a lock for exactly this reason.
It is possibly Crossocerus varus.




Another wasp possibly Field Digger Wasp Argogorytes mystaceus on farm road to northeast of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse



Ferdinandea cuprea in front of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse. I only have one other record of this hoverfly.

Chrysotoxum arcuatum and larva on farm road to northeast of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

The caterpillar could be Northern Eggar but it doesn’t look the same as those that I often find on the moorland.

Leucozona lucorum at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse and on farm road to northeast of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse, Sericomyia lappona, and Sphaerophoria on farm road to northeast of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary on farm road to northeast of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse

probably Pyrausta cingulata new mason bee cliff south of Ensay Burn mouth

beetle poss Ctenicera cupreaa on farm road to northeast of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

dung beetle possibly Anoplotrupes stercorosus on farm road to northeast of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

Red-breasted Carrion Beetle Oiceoptoma thoracicum to north of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

Bracken Chafer Phyllopertha horticola at cliffs to south of Ensay Burn mouth.

and another Chafer at Treshnish wood waterfall but all purple, which I think actually a different form of the same species.

Very disappointing to see that 2 newly discovered Narrow-leaved Helleborines on Ensay have been eaten just in the last week, probably by sheep or deer.
Globeflower in TW waterfall field.

27th: 1 fritillary in front of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse. At this time of year it can only be Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary (first of the year) and 1 Orange-tip in front of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

3 Leucozona lucorum at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse. I took a really bad, out of focus shot last year which was accepted so it was great to see it properly today.


Portevinia maculata on farm road in front of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse (all my 6 records are from May)

Sericomyia lappona at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse

and a Sphaerophoria species behind the Treshnish wood Nissan hut.

and 2 Picture-winged Flies Euleia heraclei at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

1 Norwegian Wasp at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.



Dolerus sawfly to northeast of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse



1 probable Common Flower Bug Anthocoris nemorum at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse

2 Ctenicera cuprea at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse (showing the 2 forms).



and a dung beetle probably Anoplotrupes stercorosus along farm road in front of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

25th: Tawny Owls calling during the day time for several days sometimes several times a day but not before noon. I hear them occasionally calling in the daytime but never like this. The call is the woo-oooo call, no kwiks.

24th: Went to have a quick look to see if I could find the Greylag goslings on Treshnish lochan. I didn’t but found a Common Gull nests at usual spot.

21st: 1 probable Red-backed Mining Bee in front of  Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.  If confirmed it is a first for Mull.
On Ensay Burn cliffs to south of the burn mouth: 1 blood bee, 1 mini-miner, 1 of the small metallic furrow bees, 1 Little Nomad Bee,



also 1 Panzer’s/Fork-jawed Nomad Bee,


1 ruby-tailed wasp species chrysura sp. and 1 mason bee.

The mason bee is almost certainly Wall Mason Bee which is very rare in Scotland but found last year along the coastal cliffs about 300m from here.



Ruby-tailed Wasps predate Wall Mason Bees.

2 or 3 Small Heaths at Treshnish wood waterfall (first of the year), 1 Orange-tip near helleborines near Treshnish Old Schoolhouse and 3 House Martins over the lochan. Leena saw Greylags adults with gosling on the lochan. The first proof of breeding at Treshnish.

Common Blue Damselfly at Ensay Burn mouth and Large Red Damselfly on farm road to northeast of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse (both firsts of the year).
1 new Narrow-leaved helleborine at Treshnish wood waterfall.

20th: Bullfinch heard TW. Grey Wagtail adult with at least 1 fledgling by Ensay Burn in Treshnish wood down to the burn mouth.


1 Red-tailed Bumblebee at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse and 1 Four-spotted Chaser at Treshnish wood waterfall (first of the year).

Marsham’s Nomad Bee on Hawthorn at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse



and at our gate an Orange-tailed Mining Bee.
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1 probable Red Wasp between Treshnish Old Schoolhouse and Ensay Burn cattle-grid.

1 Brachyopa, possibly Brachyopa scutellaris at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

1 beetle almost certainly Ctenicera cuprea at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

and beetle Cantharis nigricans at cliffs to west of Ensay Burn mouth.

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probably daggerfly Empis tessellata at cliffs to west of Ensay Burn mouth


1 Cheilosia illustrata at at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse (first of the year).
Narrow-leaved Hellebororine at top (and little to south) of path out of EB lower burnside path (I may have said it was Broad-leaved in previous blog post, will check)

19th: 1 beetle probably Athous haemorrhoidalis at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

1+ (=4) new Narrow-leaved Helleborines at new site at Ensay side of Treshnish wood and 1 Broad-leaved Helleborine and 1 Narrow-leaved Helleborine near owl-box is flowering (all the known Treshnish Narrow-leaved Hellebrorines are flowering).
Flowering Narrow-leaved Hellebororine just below top of path out of EB lower burnside path (this is where Broad-leaved Helleborine are usually found)

17th: 1 Red Wasp at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse (a garden first).

16th: 1 Cheilosia chrysocoma at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse. This is a Nationally Scarce species which according to the maps in Ball and Morris has been recorded on Mull before although there are no records on NBN Atlas. I have a couple of outstanding records for last year which I am still awaiting verification but this one today has been accepted.



1 Marsham’s Nomad Bee on Hawthorn at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse (a garden first).


15th: A Sparrowhawk with prey circled over Treshnish wood but then headed east (presumably to Calgary wood) where there must be a nest.

3 new Narrow-leaved Helleborines at new site at Ensay side of Treshnish wood (1 flowering) and 3 new non-flowering plants along farm road through Treshnish wood.
1 female Orange-tailed Mining Bee at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse
1 mini-miner at Treshnish wood waterfall.

1 male Helophilus pendulus and 1 probable Eupeodes corollae at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

and 1 possible Platycheirus ambiguus along burnside south of Ensay Burn mouth.

1 daggerfly probably Empis tessellata at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

14th: 1-2 Orange-tip at waterfall and at EB cattle grid.
1 female Orange-tailed Mining Bee at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.
1 Panzer’s or Fork-jawed Nomad Bee

and 1 probable Marsham’s Nomad Bee at Treshnish wood waterfall.

1 female Clarke’s Mining Bee still entering nest burrow at Treshnish wood waterfall
1 brief glimpse of a bee with black head and thorax and what looks like an all red abdomen. Unfortunately the two photographs are not in focus. There are no Scottish nomad bees with an all red abdomen and blood bees have a black tail.

13th: 1 House Martin over Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.
1 of the small metallic furrow bees at Ensay Burn cliffs to south of the burn mouth.|

and at the same site at least 1 larger furrow bee, at least 1 blood bee, a probable Marsham’s Nomad Bee and another which looked like Panzer’s or Fork-tailed Nomad Bee and 1 Red Wasp and 1 beetle probably Athous haemorrhoidalis.

1 Fabricius’ Nomad Bee and furrow bee at Treshnish wood waterfall.
1 Orange-tip at Treshnish wood waterfall.

1 or 2 female Orange-tailed Mining Bee at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

Many Chocolate Mining Bees on the Hawthorn at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse but some look different (reddish thorax and long orange hairs on inner tergites, black face and white pollen brushes on hind tibia). I sent it to an expert and he doesn’t think it is Chocolate Mining Bee but doesn’t know what it could be. I am hoping he is consulting with other experts.

1 of the presumed male Chocolate Mining Bees repeatedly attacked a white-tailed bumblebee eventually forcing it away.





1 Brachyopa and possibly Brachyopa scutellaris at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse. This time I may have got a shot of the kidney shaped spot on the inner side of the antennae which is diagnostic for scutellaris.


1 Eristalis intricaria (first of year?) and 1 Norwegian Wasp at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.
2 Broad-leaved Hellebrones emerging below concrete ramp.

12th: Sparrowhawk flying into Treshnish wood. Broad-leaved Helleborine merging at conc ramp and all 3 plants (4 including the twin) along the farm road edge, are flowering or about to flower.

1 Norwegian Wasp

and 1 Sericomyia lappona at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

A new Mull hoverfly at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse is a Brachyopa and possibly Brachyopa scutellaris.

Another hoverfly could be narrowed down to Cheilosia proxima or Cheilosia velutina, either of which would be knew to Mull.



Beetle probably Athous haemorrhoidalis.

11th: Parsley-piert to southwest of East cottage, Haunn.
1 Red-tailed Bumblebee at Treshnish Old Schoolhouse.

10th: 100+ geese migrating around Treshnish Point into Calgary bay.

9th: Collared Dove calling in Treshnish wood and surrounds.

8th: Bullfinch heard in Treshnish wood and Whitethroat around Treshnish Old Schoolhouse

6th: On burn side cliffs to east of Ensay Burn mouth a Nomad Bee which looks like Early Nomad Bee but it flew before I could get more angles.



And at the sea cliffs to west of Ensay Burn mouth another nomad bee which could be Panzer’s or Fork-jawed Nomad Bee. Without a view of the tip of the mandible it is I think impossible to specify.




A new hoverfly for Mull in front of Treshnish Old Schoolhouse although it can only be narrowed down to the genus. It is an Epistrophe and probably E. nitidicollis.

Also in the same area, Chrysotoxum arcuatum, a species that I have only recorded 3 times, once in early September 2015 and twice last year (late June and early September).

5th: Tree Pipit, Cuckoo and Whitethroat at Loch Frisa, Sedge Warbler heard at Derevaig reedbeds (all first of year for me).

4th: Peregrine at Haunn and I heard that a Haunn guest saw one on about the 28th or 29th of last month.

2nd: 1 immature Peregrine over the Common Gull colony at Treshnish lochan. It was interesting how the gulls responded compared to a White-tailed Eagle which passed over 5 minutes before. With the eagle there was the usual noise and a couple of gulls chasing it off but with the Peregrine as well as the usual alarm calls, over 10 birds flew in perfect close formation to the north in front of the falcon with another group following it.
At Treshnish wood waterfall, at least 2 Fabricius’ Nomad Bees, at least 2 female Clarke’s Mining Bees (an another possible male), a mining bee, some furrow bees including one which is I at first thought was probably White-footed Furrow Bee, one of the 4 small metallic blue-green species but now after looking more carefully, think the head shape is not round enough. I waited 3 hours at the nest hole entrance of the latter to get shots of the whole body but it was busy burrowing with periods of rest hidden at the entrance. It never did emerge although I missed it when I moved position and caught it (or a second) entering briefly. White-footed Furrow Bee is primitively eusocial. The other similar species are Turquoise Furrow Bee, Green Furrow Bee (which is also primitively eusocial with the workers appearing in the early summer) and Smeathman’s Furrow Bee. The latter two are rare in Scotland and so far restricted to the south with 3 and 4-5 records consecutively.
I have one accepted White-footed Furrow Bee and 2 accepted Turquoise Furrow Bees from last year.
Comparing it with the head shape in Falk, I think it is probably Turquoise Furrow Bee.



I am seeing Bee Fly on every mildly sunny day.

Also 1 Cheilosia albipila accepted by an expert at Treshnish wood waterfall. This is one of the new species for Treshnish as one was accepted recently but from last year.

1st: 1 Dipper at top Ensay Burn bridge waterfall. Not much in the way of bees there but many female Clarke’s Mining Bees on the willow along the burn between the that waterfall and the first bridge as well as a Norwegian Wasp and a Green Hair-streak and Wilson’s Filmy-fern.

1 Bee Fly at the north end of the Ensay hairpin bends and a Green Tiger Beetle at Ensay car-park.
2 furrow bees by the east gate to Black Park and at least  1 female Clarke’s Bee entering the nearby nest bank and what I think is my first Heath Bumblebee of the year. 1 female Orange-tailed Mining Bee at the Black Park quarry and also a fermale Clarke’s Mining Bee entering a nest broow there and another entering a nest burrow at a new site in small waterfall on a runnel up from near the west gate of Black Park at the site where last year there was a Keeled Skimmer. 1 furrow bee to east of Treshnish wood Nissen hut and a queen Common Wasp.

 May 3, 2019

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